Unit 1: Working in the Private Security Industry

Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
The learner will: The learner can:
1. Know the purpose and main features of the private security industry 1.1 Define the main purposes of the private security industry
1.2 Identify different sectors and career opportunities within the private security industry
1.3 State the main aims of the Private Security Industry Act
1.4 Identify the main functions of the Security Industry Authority and other key bodies within the private security industry
1.5 Describe the main qualities required by security industry operatives
2. Understand the legislation that is relevant to people working in the private security industry 2.1 Identify the differences between civil and criminal law
2.2 Identify aspects of human rights legislation that are relevant to the private security industry
2.3 State the data protection principles outlined in data protection legislation
2.4 Describe types of discrimination that can occur in the workplace
2.5 Identify how equal opportunities legislation applies in the workplace
3. Understand relevant aspects of health and safety in the workplace 3.1 Outline the importance of health and safety in the workplace
3.2 Identify the main responsibilities of employees, employers and the self employed under health and safety legislation
3.3 Identify ways of minimising risk to personal safety and security
3.4 Identify typical hazards in the workplace
3.5 Describe safe methods of manual handling
3.6 Identify commonly used safety signs
3.7 Describe appropriate reporting procedures for accidents and injuries
4. Know how to apply the principles of fire safety 4.1 Identify the three components that must be present for fire to exist
4.2 Describe how fire can be prevented
4.3 Identify fires by their classification
4.4 Identify the types and uses of fire extinguishers and fire fighting equipment
4.5 State appropriate responses on discovering a
fire
4.6 Explain the importance of understanding fire evacuation procedures
5. Know how to deal with non-fire-related workplace emergencies 5.1 Define the term ‘emergency’ when used in the workplace
5.2 Identify types of workplace emergencies
5.3 Identify appropriate responses to workplace emergencies
5.4 Outline the procedures for dealing with bomb threat warning calls
5.5 Identify appropriate responses to situations requiring first aid
6. Understand the principles of effective communication and customer care in the private security industry 6.1 Describe the elements of the communication process
6.2 Identify methods of verbal and non-verbal
communication
6.3 Identify common barriers to communication
6.4 State the importance of effective communication in the workplace
6.5 Identify different types of customers and how their needs can vary
6.6 Describe the principles of customer care

Unit Content

LO1: Know the purpose and main features of the private security industry

LO2: Understand the legislation that is relevant to people working in the private security industry

LO3: Understand relevant aspects of health and safety in the workplace

LO4: Know how to apply the principles of fire safety

LO5: Know how to deal with non-fire-related workplace emergencies

LO6: Understand the principles of effective communication and customer care in the private security industry

Unit 2: Working as a Door Supervisor

Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
The learner will: The learner can:
1. Understand the behaviour appropriate for individual door supervisors, as defined by the Security Industry Authority’s (SIA) Standards of Behaviour 1.1 Identify the key elements of the SIA’s Standards of Behaviour for door supervisors
1.2 State the reasons why standards of behaviour are required
1.3 Identify the requirements specifically relating to SIA licensing
1.4 Define the role and objectives of the door supervisor
1.5 Identify the key qualities of a door supervisor
2. Understand the elements of civil and criminal law relevant to door supervisors 2.1 State the law relating to use of force
2.2 Identify the different types of assault as defined by law
2.3 List offences against property that a door supervisor may come across
2.4 State the options available to a door supervisor when the law is broken
3. Understand search procedures and the reasons for having them 3.1 State the importance of an admissions policy
3.2 Identify common areas that can be included in an admissions policy
3.3 Identify the reasons for searching premises
3.4 State how to search people and their property
3.5 State the differences between general, random and specific searches
3.6 Identify the hazards involved with conducting searches and appropriate precautions that can be taken
3.7 State the definitions of offensive weapons
3.8 Outline the procedures for handling and
recording
4. Understand the powers of arrest and related procedures 4.1 Identify indictable offences
4.2 Identify factors to consider when deciding whether to make a citizen's arrest
4.3 Outline the procedures for making a citizen's arrest
4.4 Outline the procedures to be followed after a citizen's arrest
5. Understand relevant drug legislation and its relevance to the role of the door supervisor 5.1 Identify aspects of current drugs legislation that apply to the role of the door supervisor
5.2 State the common indicators of drug misuse
5.3 Identify common types of illegal drugs
5.4 State how to recognise signs of drug dealing
5.5 Outline the procedure for dealing with customers found to be in possession of drugs
5.6 State how to dispose of drug related litter and waste safely
6. Understand incident recording and crime scene preservation 6.1 Identify the types of, and reasons for, records needed to be kept by a door supervisor
6.2 Identify incidents which need to be recorded and when the police are to be called
6.3 State the procedures for record keeping
6.4 Identify the different types of evidence
6.5 Outline the rules to be followed to appropriately preserve evidence and crime scenes
7. Understand licensing law and social responsibility 7.1 State the licensing objectives under current alcohol licensing legislation
7.2 State the different types of licences issued and the activities they allow
7.3 State circumstances under which customers can be ejected
7.4 State police powers with regard to licensed premises
7.5 State the powers of entry of authorised persons
7.6 Outline the rights and duties of licensees and door supervisors as their representatives
7.7 Outline relevant legislation regarding children and young people
7.8 Identify activities considered unlawful under
licensing, gaming and sexual offences legislation
8. Understand and be able to follow procedures for emergency situations 8.1 Identify common human responses in an emergency situation
8.2 State the reasons for having fire risk assessments and maximum occupancy figures
8.3 Identify behaviours that could indicate unusual
and suspicious activity
8.4 Identify current counter terrorism issues and procedures as they relate to the role of a door
supervisor
8.5 Identify common situations requiring first aid that occur in licensed premises
8.6 State how to safely dispose of contaminated
waste

Unit Content

LO1 Understand the behaviour appropriate for individual door supervisors, as defined by the Security Industry Authority’s (SIA) Standards of Behaviour

LO2 Understand the elements of civil and criminal law relevant to door supervisors

LO3 Understand search procedures and the reasons for having them

LO4 Understand the powers of arrest and related procedures

LO5 Understand relevant drug legislation and its relevance to the role of the door supervisor

LO6 Understand incident recording and crime scene preservation

LO7 Understand licensing law and social responsibility

LO8 Understand and be able to follow procedures for emergency situations

Unit 3: Conflict Management for the Private Security Industry

Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
The learner will: The learner can:
1. Understand the principles of conflict management appropriate to their role 1.1 State the importance of positive and constructive communication to avoid conflict
1.2 Identify the importance of employer policies, guidance and procedures relating to workplace violence
1.3 Identify factors that can trigger an angry response in others
1.4 Identify factors that can inhibit an angry response in others
1.5 Identify how managing customer expectations can reduce the risk of conflict
1.6 Identify human responses to emotional and threatening situations
2. Understand how to recognise, assess and reduce risk in conflict situations 2.1 Identify the stages of escalation in conflict situations
2.2 Explain how to apply dynamic risk assessment to a conflict situation
3. Understand how to communicate effectively in emotive situations and deescalate conflict 3.1 State how to use non-verbal communication in emotive situations
3.2 Identify how to overcome communication barriers
3.3 Identify the differences between assertiveness and aggression
3.4 Identify ways of defusing emotive conflict situations
3.5 Identify appropriate approaches to take when confronting unacceptable behaviour
3.6 Identify how to work with colleagues to deescalate conflict situations
3.7 State the importance of positioning and exit routes
4. Understand how to develop and use problem solving strategies for resolving conflict 4.1 State the importance of viewing the situation from the customer’s perspective
4.2 Identify strategies for solving problems
4.3 Identify win-win approaches to conflict situations
5. Understand good practice to follow after conflict situations 5.1 State the importance of accessing help and support following an incident
5.2 State the importance of reflecting on and learning from conflict situations
5.3 Identify the importance of sharing good practice
5.4 State the importance of contributing to solutions to reoccurring problems

Unit Content

LO1: Understand the principles of conflict management appropriate to their role

LO2: Understand how to recognise, assess and reduce risk in conflict situations.

LO3: Understand how to communicate effectively in emotive situations and de-escalate conflict

LO4: Understand how to develop and use problem solving strategies for resolving conflict.

LO5: Understand good practice to follow after conflict situations

Application of Communication Skills and Conflict Management for Door Supervisors

Aim:

To observe, discuss and participate in scenario situations requiring effective communication skills and conflict management. This is so that learners become aware of situations likely to lead to conflict and
can apply knowledge of effective communication and conflict management skills to these situations.

1. Refusing entry to a customer on the grounds of:

Objective:

By the end of this session learners will understand the rules regarding entry refusal and will know how to refuse entry in a way that reduces the risk of conflict.

2. Ejecting a customer from the venue due to:

Objective:

By the end of this session learners will understand the rules regarding ejection and will know how to eject a customer in a way that reduces the risk of conflict.

3. Incidents inside the venue, such as:

Objective:

By the end of this session learners will be able to identify some of the types of incidents that occur inside the venue, and to understand how they can deal with them in a way that reduces the risk of
conflict. They will also understand the law about arrest in relation to a door supervisor’s role.

Scenario Situations:

The following are examples of scenarios which should be used as role plays and in discussions to reinforce the communication skills and conflict management learning. Nominated Tutors are recommended to use at least one from each section below.

Refusal scenarios:

1. Refuse entry to customers when the venue is full, explaining why no more people can come in, explaining that they may be allowed in if and when other customers leave.

2. Refuse entry to someone who is obviously under the influence of drink or drugs. Some customers may complain, but go away; others will argue and may become aggressive.

3. Refuse entry to someone who appears to be under the age of 18 (or 21), and cannot provide appropriate ID.

4. Refuse entry to someone who breaches the venue’s dress code, i.e. someone wearing trainers where this is not allowed.

5. Refuse entry to someone who wants to come in free of charge, who either cannot pay the

admission charge or who claims to be a friend of someone who works there.

6. Refuse entry to someone who refuses to be searched as a part of the entry conditions.

7. Refuse entry to someone found in possession of either an offensive weapon or drugs.

8. Refuse entry to someone who is banned from entering the premises because of previous behaviour, or who is under a court exclusion order not to enter licensed premises or, who is on a ‘pub watch’ ban.

9. Refuse entry to someone who behaves aggressively at the point of entry, and is therefore not suitable to be allowed in.

Ejection scenarios:

10. Eject a customer for being suspected of theft, criminal damage, assault or drugs inside the venue (where no Police action is required). Some customers will leave when asked to do so; others will argue and/or may become aggressive.

11. Eject a customer who breaches licensing laws by becoming very drunk or argumentative or aggressive inside the venue. Some customers will leave when asked; others will argue and/or become aggressive;

12. Eject a customer for breaching a house rule such as repeatedly dancing on tables or carrying bottles/glasses on the dance floor.

Incident scenarios:

13. Advise a customer regarding unacceptable behaviour inside the venue. Try to stop the behaviour, warning the customer about further action if the behaviour persists.

14. Deal with a first aid incident where other drunken customers try to take over.

15. Deal with a domestic dispute which turns into a noisy incident inside the venue.

16. Deal with other disputes inside the venue, such as a customer arguing with bar staff over incorrect change given, or a complaint about poor service.

17. Deal with various aggressive arguments between customers, to try to prevent them from turning physical.

18. Deal with customers (usually drunk) who refuse to leave the premises at closing time.

19. Arrest a customer as a last resort. Some customers will comply with the arrest; others will become argumentative or aggressive.

20. Deal with people in the 14-18 age group who may be under the influence of alcohol or drugs.


Unit 4: Physical Intervention Skills for the Private Security Industry

 

Learning Outcomes Assessment Criteria
The learner will: The learner can:
1. Understand physical interventions and the legal and professional implications of their use 1.1 Identify the differences between defensive physical skills and physical interventions
1.2 Identify the differences between non-restrictiveand restrictive interventions
1.3 Identify positive alternatives to physical intervention
1.4 State the importance of only using physical intervention skills as a last resort
1.5 State legal implications relating to the use of physical interventions
2. Understand how to reduce the risk of harm when physical intervention skills are used 2.1 State the importance of dynamic risk assessment in situations where physical intervention skills are used
2.2 Identify the risk factors involved with the use of physical interventions
2.3 Identify ways of reducing the risk of harm during physical interventions
2.4 State responsibilities immediately following physical interventions
2.5 State the importance of keeping physical intervention knowledge and skills current
3. Be able to use non-pain related physical skills to protect yourself and others from assault 3.1 Demonstrate non-aggressive stance and positioning skills
3.2 Demonstrate non-aggressive skills used to evade and protect against blows
3.3 Demonstrate non-aggressive methods of disengagement from grabs and holds
3.4 Demonstrate non-aggressive methods to stop one person assaulting another
3.5 Demonstrate non-aggressive team methods to separate persons fighting
3.6 Communicate professionally with the subject of physical intervention, colleagues and other
4. Be able to use non-pain related standing holding and escorting techniques, including non-restrictive and restrictive skills Demonstrate the use of a method for physically prompting a person
4.2 Demonstrate the use of a non-restrictive method of escorting a person
4.3 Demonstrate the use of a one-person low level restrictive standing hold that can be used as an
escort
4.4 Demonstrate the use of a two-person restrictive standing hold that can be used as an escort
4.5 Demonstrate how to provide support to colleagues during a physical intervention
4.6 Demonstrate how to de-escalate and disengage a physical intervention ensuring safety for both
parties
4.7 Communicate professionally with the subject of physical intervention, other customers and colleagues, while using prompting, holding and escorting techniques
5. Understand good practice to follow after physical interventions 5.1 State the importance of accessing help and support following an incident
5.2 State the importance of reflecting on and learning from physical intervention situations
5.3 Identify additional factors when reporting and accounting for use of force

Unit Content

LO1: Understand physical interventions and the legal and professional implications of their use

(Note: Underpinning knowledge of interpersonal communication will have been completed as part of Common unit and Conflict Management unit)

LO2: Understand how to reduce the risk of harm when physical intervention skills are used

Although lawful in certain circumstances, such interventions will require high levels of justification and training. The longer the duration of the restraint the greater the risk

LO3: Be able to use non aggressive physical skills to protect yourself and others from assault

LO4: Be able to use non-pain related standing holding and escorting techniques, including nonrestrictive and restrictive skills

LO5: Understand good practice to follow after physical interventions

(Note: Learners will have underpinning knowledge surrounding action following incidents reporting and report writing from Working as a Door Supervisor – LO7)

Standards of Behaviour for Door Supervisors

A door supervisor should at all times:

Professional Attitude & Skills

A door supervisor should:

General Conduct

In carrying out his/her duty, a door supervisor should:

Organisation / Company Values and Standards

A door supervisor should:

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